Dangerous Words

This week’s episode (here) of The Bard and the Bible Podcast features a short monologue by Tamora, queen of the Goths, in Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and pairs it with James 3:3-8 in the King James Version of the Bible.

bard-and-bible-podcastRatings and reviews on iTunes are much appreciated. You can also easily subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, to ensure that you never miss an episode.

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The Bard, the Bible, and Baseball, Part 2

Bet you didn’t know that both the King James Version of the Bible and the Bard’s works mentioned baseball repeatedly, did you? It’s true.

baseball-serie-2-1426616

Last week, in honor of the start of Spring Training, this blog featured a listing of major league baseball teams that are mentioned in Shakespeare, the Bible, or both. This week, in anticipation of the Cincinnati Reds’s first Spring Training game (Friday at 3:05 pm), we offer an incomplete list of baseball references from both Shakespeare and the Bible:

The game

Now therefore make ye a league with us (Joshua 9:6).

Seek out a man, who is a cunning player (1 Samuel 16:16).

Let the young men now arise, and play before us (2 Samuel 2:14).

Come, my coach! (Hamlet).

Come, and be our Captain (Judges 11:6).

Pitchers

Look to the plate (Romeo and Juliet).

And they pitched one over against the other (1 Kings 20:29).

All men’s honours Lie like one lump before him, to be fashion’d Into what pitch he please (Henry VIII).

Thou hast a mighty arm: Strong is thy hand, and high is thy right hand (Psalm 89:13).

And what a pitch (1 Henry VI).

Thou hast scattered thine enemies with thy strong arm (Psalm 89:10).

For this relief much thanks (Hamlet).

And Miriam was shut out (Numbers 12:15).

Hitters

Aaron stretched out his hand with his rod, and smote the dust of the earth (Exodus 8:17).

A hit, a very palpable hit! (Hamlet).

Behold, I will send swarms of flies upon thee (Exodus 8:21).

And watched him how he singled (3 Henry VI).

Thou shalt fall upon the open field (Ezekiel 39:5).

You may go walk (The Taming of the Shrew).

O my offense is rank, it smells to heaven (Hamlet).

Sweet sacrifice (Henry VIII).

Fielders

Sir, your glove (The Two Gentlemen of Verona).

And so I shall catch the fly (Henry V)

O hateful error (Julius Caesar).

And have is have, however men do catch (King John).

And when he caught it, he let it go again (Coriolanus).

That one error fills him with faults (The Two Gentlemen of Verona).

Your play needs no excuse (A Midsummer Night’s Dream).

Baserunners

You have scarce time to steal (Henry VIII).

Get you early on your way, that thou mayest go home (Judges 19:9).

Run, run, O run! (King Lear).

I shall be safe (Psalm 119:117).

He was a thief, and had the bag (John 12:6).

The righteous runneth into it, and is safe (Proverbs 18:10).

Get you home (Julius Caesar).

He comes the third time home (Coriolanus).

Umpires

There is three umpires in this matter (The Merry Wives of Windsor).

Behold, thou art fair (Song of Songs 1:15).

When he speaketh fair, believe him not (Proverbs 26:25).

Fair is foul and foul is fair (Macbeth).

O, tis fair (Troilus and Cressida).

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Arise, Fair Sun

This week’s episode (here) of The Bard and the Bible Podcast pairs Romeo’s lines in the famous balcony scene from Romeo and Juliet with similar sentiments by “the lover” in Song of Solomon 2:10-13 in the King James Version of the Bible.

bard-and-bible-podcastRatings and reviews on iTunes are much appreciated. You can also easily subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, to ensure that you never miss an episode.

Each episode of The Bard and the Bible Podcast offers short readings from Shakespeare and scripture for your inspiration, meditation, or memorization. The host is Bob Hostetler, author of The Bard and the Bible: A Shakespeare Devotional. The episodes, highlighting correspondences or contrasts between the bard’s words and the Bible’s wisdom, can be enjoyed repeatedly and even used as an aid to memorization. Each week’s passages are presented without commentary or interpretation, allowing the listener to draw his or her own conclusions.

Episodes are posted every Friday, and announced on this blog. Listeners can suggest readings or pairings they’d like to hear by commenting on this blog, on the podcast page, or on iTunes.

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The Bard, the Bible, and Baseball, Part 1

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Baseball starts this week! Well, Spring Training, anyway. So what could be more appropriate here on The Bard and the Bible blog than a post about “The Bard, the Bible, and Baseball?”

Maybe you didn’t know that both the King James Version of the Bible and the Bard’s works mentioned baseball repeatedly. No? Well, stick around. We begin today by sharing a list of major league teams that are mentioned in the Bard and the Bible:

Los Angeles Angels 
(“The angels shall come forth” Matthew 13:49;
“Here are the angels that you sent for” The Comedy of Errors)

Toronto Blue Jays
(“We’ll teach him to know turtles from jays” The Merry Wives of Windsor)

Atlanta Braves
(“Sirrah, I will not bear these braves of thine” The Taming of the Shrew)

Milwaukee Brewers
(“When brewers mar their malt with water” King Lear)

St. Louis Cardinals 
(“Two great cardinals Wait” Henry VIII)

Chicago Cubs
(“Pluck the young sucking cubs from the she-bear” The Merchant of Venice)

San Francisco Giants
(“Giants may jet through” Cymbeline;
“There were giants in the earth in those days” Genesis 6:4)

Seattle Mariners
(“Then the mariners were afraid” Jonah 1:5;
“There shalt thou find the mariners asleep” The Tempest)

Pittsburgh Pirates 
(“I must Rid all the sea of pirates” Antony and Cleopatra)

Detroit Tigers
(“Dost thou not perceive That Rome is but a wilderness of tigers?” Titus Andronicus)

Minnesota Twins
(“A pair of twins appear’d” Antony and Cleopatra)

Stay tuned. Next week, we’ll feature references to baseball play in the Bard and the Bible.

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Love and Charity

This week’s episode (here) of The Bard and the Bible Podcast pairs Shakespeare’s famous Sonnet 116 with the Bible’s “Love Chapter,” 1 Corinthians 13 in the King James Version of the Bible.

bard-and-bible-podcastRatings and reviews on iTunes are much appreciated. You can also easily subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, to ensure that you never miss an episode.

Each episode of The Bard and the Bible Podcast offers short readings from Shakespeare and scripture for your inspiration, meditation, or memorization. The host is Bob Hostetler, author of The Bard and the Bible: A Shakespeare Devotional. The episodes, highlighting correspondences or contrasts between the bard’s words and the Bible’s wisdom, can be enjoyed repeatedly and even used as an aid to memorization. Each week’s passages are presented without commentary or interpretation, allowing the listener to draw his or her own conclusions.

Episodes are posted every Friday, and announced on this blog. Listeners can suggest readings or pairings they’d like to hear by commenting on this blog, on the podcast page, or on iTunes.

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Brush Up Your Shakespeare with this True/False Quiz

Shakespeare-Smiles-Wink-HeadshotWanna “brush up your Shakespeare,” as Slug and Lippy sang in Kiss Me, Kate? Look no further. Here is a short true/false quiz to see if you can distinguish real Shakespeare quotes from non-Shakespeare.

Which of these are from Shakespeare? Answers follow the break:

  1. “We cannot all be masters, nor all masters cannot be truly follow’d.”
  2. “Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind.”
  3. “Come live with me and be my love, And we will all the pleasures prove, That valleys, groves, hills, and fields, Woods, or steepy mountain yields.”
  4. “Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more.”
  5. “A merry heart maketh a cheerful countenance.”
  6. “There’s a divinity that shapes our ends, Rough-hew them how we will.”
  7. “Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove.”
  8. “We are such stuff as dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.”
  9. “Death be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, for, thou art not so.”
  10. “O heaven, were man But constant, he were perfect.”

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Little or Much

This week’s episode (here) of The Bard and the Bible Podcast pairs a short monologue by Petruchio from Act 5 of The Taming of the Shrew with Ecclesiastes 5:10-12 in the King James Version of the Bible.

bard-and-bible-podcastRatings and reviews on iTunes are much appreciated. You can also easily subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, to ensure that you never miss an episode.

Each episode of The Bard and the Bible Podcast offers short readings from Shakespeare and scripture for your inspiration, meditation, or memorization. The host is Bob Hostetler, author of The Bard and the Bible: A Shakespeare Devotional. The episodes, highlighting correspondences or contrasts between the bard’s words and the Bible’s wisdom, can be enjoyed repeatedly and even used as an aid to memorization. Each week’s passages are presented without commentary or interpretation, allowing the listener to draw his or her own conclusions.

Episodes are posted every Friday, and announced on this blog. Listeners can suggest readings or pairings they’d like to hear by commenting on this blog, on the podcast page, or on iTunes.

Posted in Podcast | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment