The “Trigger Warning” Guide to Shakespeare

Cambridge University made the news last week with reports that its English Faculty’s “Notes on Lectures” contained warnings that a lecture on Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and The Comedy of Errors would include “discussions of sexual violence” and “sexual assault.”

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So, since we here at The Bard and the Bible blog always seek to be helpful in matters pertaining to Shakespeare, we offer the following list of Shakespeare’s plays and their related trigger warnings: 

The Comedy of Errors: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Henry VI, Part 1: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Henry VI, Part 2: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Henry VI, Part 3: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Richard III: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
The Taming of the Shrew: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Titus Andronicus: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Romeo and Juliet: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Two Gentlemen of Verona: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Love’s Labour’s Lost: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Richard II: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
A Midsummer Night’s Dream: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
King John: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
The Merchant of Venice: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Henry IV, Part 1: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Henry IV, Part 2: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Henry V: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Much Ado about Nothing: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Twelfth Night: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
As You Like It: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Julius Caesar: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Hamlet: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
The Merry Wives of Windsor: reflects late-16th-century English mores and standards
Troilus and Cressida: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
All’s Well That Ends Well: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
Othello: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
Measure for Measure: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
King Lear: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
Macbeth: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
Antony and Cleopatra: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
Coriolanus: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
Timon of Athens: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
Pericles: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
Cymbeline: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
The Winter’s Tale: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
The Tempest: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards
Henry VIII: reflects early 17th-century English mores and standards

You’re welcome. Come back often to The Bard and the Bible blog for more helpful and entertaining (according, roughly, to early 21st-century mores and standards) content.

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About writerhoss

I am a writer from southwestern Ohio, and a frequent speaker at churches, conferences, and retreats. My books include The Bard and the Bible (A Shakespeare Devotional).
This entry was posted in Plays and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The “Trigger Warning” Guide to Shakespeare

  1. I enjoyed this. You’re absolutely right.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. writerhoss says:

    I know, right?

    Like

  3. Pingback: Crimes Against Shakespeare 008 – The Boar's Head, Eastcheap

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